Trimming the House

An old house brings lots of challenges with it…and my new old house certainly has not done anything to disappoint. In the past 2 weeks, my driveway has looked more like the drive-thru at McDonalds than a residence.  Plumbers, electricians, roofers and more have become very familiar with my home. Some repairs were anticipated, while, unfortunately, others were not:) But I know myself well enough to know that if I didn’t deal with it now, it would be 5 years before I got around to doing it!

So back to repairs. The most glaring of them was the roof. It was in bad shape and needed to be replaced. Shingles were literally piling up in the gutters. Such a lovely welcoming sight:) The old roof was brown, and unless I could replace it with a beautiful cedar shake, I didn’t want another brown roof.  As much as I love cedar shake roofs, I don’t love the hefty price tag that comes with them. So, unfortunately, that was off the table. I needed to find something that would serve as a good accent against the pretty dark red brick on the front of the house. I didn’t want the roof to compete with the house but rather complement it. So after some thought, I decided to go with a black and gray architectural shingle.

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The new roof did wonders for my beautiful old red brick exterior on the front.  It accented the house so well! (And I can’t say enough great things about my roofer, Charlie Tubberville, and his company, Tennessee Roofing Concepts. If you live in Nashville–he is worth a call!)

Now that the roof had been dealt with, I could now focus on other exterior elements.

Let me first describe my house. It has a LOT going on, on the outside. Old red brick on the front, hardyboard siding on one side and stucco on the other.  Oh yes, and a stone foundation along with stone accents on the front windows. WHEW!

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 Brick, Stucco, Stone and Shutters on the Front

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Brick, Stone and Hardyboard Siding on one side

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Stucco and Brick on other side and on back

With that many elements, there needed to be one focus and the rest somehow more streamlined together.

Hello, ONE color.

I loved the old red brick and beautiful stone, but the rest of my home needed to be unified and brightened up at the same time. The khaki siding color and dark chocolate trim were pretty, but needed to brighten up from their existing hues. In my mind, their colors were competing with the colors of the stone, brick, roof and everything else going on with the house. It was hard to know where to focus your attention when looking at the house.

So, after lots of thought and Instagram feedback (thank you, friends!), I decided to….(drumroll, please)… repaint with Benjamin Moore White Down for both the siding and trim. The stucco would be reapplied on the other sides, to match the siding color.

Here is an idea of how it will look.

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A lot brighter! I know it may be hard to envision right now, but I am absolutely excited about the end result.

In addition, I wanted to streamline the front a bit more. the shutters were stealing the spotlight away from the pretty stone accents. They were also making the front elevation too busy for me.

So, here is the before with shutters (also with an old roof):

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And the after with no shutters…well, almost. (Needed a taller ladder for top window)

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Much better. See how the new roof accents the brick better? And now you notice the stone accents above the windows too.

Now I’m off to call the painter to get to work on the trim…and find a taller ladder for that last shutter. Stay tuned!

Happy Monday!

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Packing and Unpacking…Takeaways from Moving Houses

I am just resurfacing after spending the last few weeks packing, moving and unpacking again. After this move, I never want to see packing paper, strapping tape or any sort of cardboard box for a very, very long time.  Anyone who tells you that they enjoy moving, that it’s easy or that their family thinks it’s an adventure is:

a) lying

b) on serious medication

c) probably vacationing somewhere the entire time their house is being boxed up, moved and unpacked again.

As much as I sound like a bitter woman, I did learn a lot throughout the moving process. It also helped that several of my friends all were (or are still going through) the same process too. Since all of you will move at some point in your life, I thought I’d share some of my moving takeaways with you that you may want to use for yourself down the road.

PRE-MOVING DAY:

1) When you are ready to start packing up your home, go and raid the liquor store.  Granted, by the end of this process, you will be drinking something heavily, but the actual reason for this takeaway is that liquor store boxes are THE BEST for packing fragile items and books. I happen to have A LOT of both, so this was crucial. Not only will your movers (or your husband) thank you, but you will greatly reduce something getting broken.

2) Make an itemized list of all furniture in each of your old house’s rooms.  Next to each piece of furniture, write where you want it to go in the new house. You will probably change your mind a few times once you get moved in, but it will help A LOT to have a plan, especially if you are having movers helping you. It made the process go a lot smoother for me (and our movers) to identify immediately at the front door of my new house where each item should go.

3) Before leaving your old home, pack a spend the night bag for each family member with 2-3 days of clothes and essentials. You are not going to be wanting to do laundry or searching for clothes right when you move in–this will allow you to tend to other issues!

4) On the heels of #3, also pack a small bag or basket of household cleaning items (windex, pledge, paper towels and detergent) as well as one for tools you might need immediately (screw driver, light bulbs, wrench, nails, etc).  I have two baskets in my kitchen as I am writing this that I have used non-stop since we moved in. Until your house is unpacked and fully functioning, it just helps to have these essentials close-by and available!

5) For the night before moving day, pack a small cooler with milk, bread, and a few other groceries. This will get you through the first night and following morning before you have a chance (or the energy) to go to the store.

MOVING DAY:

1) Have a case of water ready to drink in your new house. You will not want to be looking for a glass somewhere to drink water from. Also, friends or movers helping with your move will thank you as well!

2) Number your rooms (literally with a piece of paper sticking outside the door) for your movers (or friends) helping you move! No one is going to want to wait and hear you describe where they are going to be taking that heavy piece of furniture they are carrying in.  Instead, just say – “Room #3″…and they’ll look for the sign! Easy.

3) EAT. You will forget. My solution was to ask my mom to bring us some sandwiches. I am lucky. Not everyone has family members nearby. If this is the case, get (or make) some lunch the morning of or night before. You will be burning a lot of energy this day, and it’s important you don’t fizzle until all the boxes are in the house!

4) Wear workout clothes and tennis shoes. This will be the hardest workout you’ve ever had. This is not a fashion show. Do not don your Tory Burch sandals or newest J. Crew skirt. (That is, unless, you are the person I mentioned in my first paragraph.) No, you will be nasty, grubby, dirty, dusty and smelly by the end of this day. Dress for it.

THE MORNING AFTER:

1) Do not schedule the cable guy to come at 8am. This might seem like a great idea prior to. But the morning after you move in, you will be DEAD TIRED. Your feet will be throbbing, you will have a headache and you will be in a zombie state for several hours. You might be muttering nonsense words, babbling moving instructions to yourself or unable to speak at all. And inevitably, the cable guy you get will be the new one – fresh out of the training school-completely oblivious on how to wire your house. And he will be there ALL DAY LONG.  So just wait. Give yourself a 24 hour break to recoup, recharge, and get back in the saddle.

2) If you are a coffee drinker (yes I am), make sure you set aside 2 coffee cups in your spend the night bag. I was the dummy who packed all my coffee cups in one of the 100 boxes labeled “kitchen”. The morning after the move, I was so excited to make a huge pot of coffee in my new kitchen, only to discover I couldn’t find a single coffee mug! After slicing open a dozen boxes to no avail (and with an ever-growing caffeine headache), I finally found 2 Christmas Spode China teacups. At this point, I was getting ready to use a sippy cup, so a teacup was a welcome sight. I did get a good laugh seeing my husband walking the dogs while sipping his coffee from his Christmas china teacup!

Finally, just remember, THIS TOO SHALL PASS. Your house will not be a sea of boxes forever. There will be a light at the end of the tunnel. Go at your own pace (not someone else’s). And as you unpack, don’t forget it’s never too late to still PURGE. There will be boxes you have brought from your old house, simply because you didn’t want to deal with it then. Well, before you stick it in the basement or attic (AGAIN), open it up. Do you need it? Will you ever use it? Will you be lost without it? If all of those are “No’s”, then let yourself be ok in getting rid of it! You’re in a new house…don’t fill it up with things you don’t need.

Good luck! And happy moving! Now, I’m off to flatten some boxes.

Anna-Kristin

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Eight Ways to Declutter the Kitchen

As I am up to my eyeballs in boxes (for packing and moving) these days, I am constantly reminding myself how I need to eliminate the clutter for my next house. The amount of stuff that keeps pouring out of my closets and cabinets, chests and shelves is embarrassing! From now on, no more piles stashed away or hidden in drawers. Mess, be gone!!

Today, I am delighted to have Jennifer Riner of Zillow as a guest writer for Interior Canvas. Her topic couldn’t be more pertinent as she shares fabulous tips on ways to declutter the most lived in room in the house…THE KITCHEN!

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The kitchen is one of the most frequented rooms of a house, and it’s no surprise that designers and agents often refer to the kitchen as, “the heart of the home.” Kitchens have many functions and typically end up messy and disorganized amidst the chaos of day-to-day life. However, it’s important to keep them clean and orderly to best serve their foremost culinary purposes.

Consider the following eight strategies to create more functional, less-cluttered kitchens.

1. Purge Old Items
Food trends are tempting to follow, especially when ingredients like chia seeds and kale reap outstanding health benefits. However, sometimes these goods, albeit healthy, aren’t the most practical for average meals and end up going stale. Some fresh fruits and vegetables turn quickly as well, even if homeowners eat them often. Make sure to regularly purge perishable foods to avoid consuming bacteria, parasites or viruses from spoiled food that can cause Salmonella or food poisoning.

2. Donate Canned Goods
It’s tempting to purchase canned soups and sides in bulk, for cheaper and seemingly better values. However, canned goods are sometimes pushed to the back of pantries, sitting idle and unnoticed for years. Their extended expiration dates occasionally encourage homeowners to keep them around a little while longer. Contrary to popular belief, canned goods do go bad after specific dates and it’s better to donate these items for immediate consumption than continue to let them take up space in pantries and cabinets.
Spend an afternoon sifting through less-frequented jars of beans and broths. Then, donate canned food to drives and local schools or libraries for good use. Contributing unused items helps those who can’t afford their own ingredients and saves space in homeowners’ cabinets for the foods they actually eat.

3. Clear off the Countertops
Even spotless kitchens display small countertop appliances like toasters and stand mixers. On the other hand, allowing small things like letters and bills to pile up and create disarray is not an effective use of food prep space. Use drawers for keys and mail, or consider wall-mounted letter holders to keep files organized. Put away small appliances so they don’t overtake counter space. Last, use bowls and vases to display fruits and flowers so kitchens appear homey but organized.

4. Label Dried Goods
Avoid stacking up old, clashing cardboard boxes in kitchen cabinets. Pour cereals, crackers and other grains into reusable, sealable plastic containers. Print labels to create seamless accessibility and orderly appearances. These containers tend to keep foods fresh longer than manufactures’ boxes, allowing more time for consumption before going stale.

5. Organize the Fridge
Store refrigerated foods according to classification, such as meat, vegetables or dairy, or organize by most applicable meal time. By designating spaces for specific foods, homeowners know where to locate their ingredients when they are pressed for time. Even better, creating grocery lists is easier when there are clear, empty spaces where staple items normally sit.

6. Creatively Hang Spices
Come up with stylish ways to hang spice racks, such as recycling tic-tac containers or hanging magnetic boards for easy organization. Spinning spice racks are common in traditional kitchens where homeowners don’t mind displaying their ingredients for guests to see. For those who prefer to keep goods hidden, use fabric over-the-door organizers with plastic pockets so labels are easy to recognize.

7. Opt for Neutral Tones
Bright and clean kitchens appear less cluttered than their richly-colored counterparts because they allow more sunlight and give the illusion of open space. Therefore, using whites and light greys in culinary spaces is better for those who prefer clean, streamlined appearances. Keep in mind that lightly-colored surfaces and walls require more upkeep, especially for households with kids. Individuals searching for new homes should keep kitchen color schemes in mind before deciding on properties. Marble countertops are beautiful, for instance, but not the most appropriate options for families with small children as the stone is porous and stains more easily than light-colored alternatives.

8. Delineate Spaces
Many families use their kitchens for more than just cooking. Kitchens transform into dining spaces, study spots, game areas and hangout rooms – depending on the time of day. Homes with large kitchens might allow owners to create multi-functional spaces within one large open layout. In this case, consider installing built-in desks along empty walls or pull-out televisions from kitchen cabinets.

These techniques require upkeep and maintenance to maintain healthy and clean kitchens. Don’t expect organization to occur in one weekend. For best results, develop good habits, promote them to housemates, significant others and/or children and adopt these practices as long-standing solutions to messy and inefficient kitchens.

Thank you, Jennifer and Zillow! I’ll be pasting these tips on my fridge as reminders in my next house! Mess, be gone!!

Happy Friday everyone!

(Photo courtesy of Zillow)

My Favorite Architecture

House hunting has been a great way to get a clear perspective into what types of architecture I am drawn to. Truth be told, I have always been looking at houses (even when I wasn’t really LOOKING). So having “house hunted” for pretty much as long as I can remember, I can easily identify now which homes I keep coming back to again and again.  So in no specific order, here are some of my favorites:

The Cottage:

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I’ve always been drawn to the cozy, charming nature of a cottage. There’s something about this style (no matter how big or small) that is always so welcoming, inviting and friendly. There are typically no formal entry halls in cottages, but rather the front door usually opens into the entry room or living room. This sets the tone for the more casual approach to the rest of the home.

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The Georgian:

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This home commands attention! I usually associate formality with this type of architecture, but in a glamorous way. Manicured lawns, pruned rose bushes, large boxwoods and big lanterns hanging over the front doors. Although I’ve never lived in one, I’ve always loved Georgians. Maybe I’ll find one for myself someday…

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The Tudor:

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The accented dormers and high pitched roof always serve as markers for the Tudor.  This home oozes charm with its accented trims and clean lines. Its rooms can be dark and quirky at times, with abrupt angles or sloping ceilings. But this is where the fun and challenge can begin with decorating, and some of my favorite rooms designed by others have been in a Tudor.

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The Stately Ranch:

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I am not sure this is actually a “technical” term for this type of home. But, you will know what I am talking about. This does not refer to the “rambling ranchers” as we like to describe them here in Nashville (the ones with low ceilings and cramped rooms that seem to ramble on and on and on). Rather, the stately ranch is a one level home with 9-10′ ceilings throughout, a formal entry hall, grand rooms and expansive grounds. These tend to only surface in older parts of town, and to my knowledge, much more in the South. They are rarely built as new construction anymore because it costs too much to put all of that square footage on one level! Because of this, they are hard to come by nowadays, so let me know if you spot one!

Time and time again, these are the styles I always resonate with the most. So now that you know my list, what are your architectural favorites?

Happy Thursday~

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(All photos taken by Interior Canvas)

Restoration Obnoxious

I always get excited when I see the big brown truck (i.e. the UPS truck) pull up to my driveway. With this day and age being flooded with emails and texts as the mode for communication, it is always fun to receive a surprise something of substance…especially in a package. That is until I received my UPS doorstep delivery, only to behold this:

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A mass of Restoration Hardware “preview collection” catalogs that weighed more than a small dog. I even measured its thickness:

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FOUR INCHES THICK!!!! Unbelievable.

No, I didn’t request this to be sent to me. As I rolled my eyes, I decided to vent on Instagram about it. Turns out I wasn’t the only one who was highly irritated at this. Most people commented they had thrown it straight to the recycle bin upon receiving. Which brings up my next point…just how many trees were cut down to create this ad campaign? I am all for promoting your business and products…but this just seems terribly reckless, expensive and an out-of-control marketing campaign!

I must have not been the only person complaining, because this is what got sent to my email today:

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Hmmm…”heavier load=lighter carbon footprint?” I’ll keep my opinions on that to myself:)

Anyways, clearly I was rubbed wrong with this ad campaign. Too big. Too heavy. Too much space taken in my recycle bin.

My challenge to Restoration Hardware? Instead of a “sustainability initiative” how about an on-line Initiative! Be bold! Take the minimalist approach! Go paper free!!!

You can even rename your slogan to: “virtual load=no carbon footprint.”

And in the meantime, please take me off your catalog mailing list.

(Images 1-2: Interior Canvas photos; 3-screenshot from Interior Canvas email)

 

 

House Hopping

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It always seems as though springtime is when the housing market gets hopping. Back when I sold real estate, I always told my clients that if there was an ideal time to sell your home, it was in the spring. Fast forward a few years, and here I am taking my own advice. You all have been privy to my polite venting about my petite home. A home that I love dearly, but a home that my family of 5 has noticeably outgrown.  My incessant purging of old and unused items, rearranging of furniture to make more space in a room, finding new storing solutions for clothes that keep getting bigger (while my closets seem to get smaller), all have finally come to a close with the realization that I just need a bigger house! So as I get ready to sadly bid adieu to my sweet home, I also find myself looking ahead to a new adventure in a new house I’ll call home.  It will take time, but I’ll slowly learn its quirks, become familiar with its noises, learn where the light falls in the morning, and where the best spot is to see the setting sun. I’ll know which windows are the best to look through when watching my children play in the yard, and I’ll discover what secrets a new variety of plants and trees will hold for me as I experience their changing beauty throughout the upcoming seasons.

Yes, I am house hopping, but with a happy nod to the past and an optimistic smile to the future.

Happy Thursday~

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The Artistic Life: Rachael McCampbell

I’m always thrilled to feature talents in the art world and today’s artist won’t disappoint. Sit back and enjoy my conversation with talented Nashville-based artist, Rachael McCampbell!

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“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening #2″ (Inspired by Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.”) 30″h x 80″w. Oil on Canvas

Share with us a little about your background and how it brought you to where you are today.

I grew up on a farm in east Tennessee and studied art at the University of Georgia. Upon graduation, I moved to Florence, Italy where I had a job with the fashion designer Emilio Pucci. After that, I lived in New York where I studied at the New School and worked for an advertising illustrator, Braldt Bralds, plus worked in art galleries. Then I went to London where I studied at Christie’s, finally settling in Los Angeles where I lived 24 years working in the art gallery world and as a commercial artist before settling into being a full time fine artist, which is what I do today.

Tennessee has always held a special place in my heart and I knew I wanted to move back here. So in 2008 I settled in the hamlet of Leiper’s Fork, which is about 10 min away from Franklin, TN, in the country. I bought a creaky, turn-of-the-century farmhouse with a big creek in the back yard, and this is where I paint.

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 “Waxwings” (Inspired by Robert Francis’ poem of the same name) 24″w x 36″h. Oil on Canvas.

I got immediately involved in the art scene here and in 2009, I had a solo show at Tinney Contemporary in downtown Nashville that was called, “Endangered Species: Nature in the Balance,” that benefited the Land Trust for Tennessee. It was about endangered and extinct species. Then in 2010, I did a solo show at the Parthenon Museum called, “Women in Mythology” which was large figurative paintings featuring the heroines of Greek myths. 2012 was a busy year as I was the official Iroquois Steeplechase artist and had a show of racing horses at Belle Meade Plantation in Nashville, plus I worked as the building contractor repairing my home from the 2010 Nashville flood. I don’t think I slept that year!

Since that time, I’ve been booked painting commissions for private clientele. I am currently painting for a solo show at The District Gallery in Knoxville, Tennessee. And I am also in the process of curating a few shows of other artists’ work from Los Angeles.

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“Magnolia Heaven” (Inspired by poem entitled “The Magnolias” by Geoffrey Dutton) 30″h x 80″w. Diptych. Oil on Canvas.

Describe the mediums in which you create art.

I paint both in acrylic and oil. For the most part, I like highly textured paintings. I build up the canvas with gels, pastes and acrylics and finish in oil. I sometimes draw on top of the finished art with charcoal, rediscovering the lines I began with. I often sand down and build paint back up revealing shapes and images that surprise me. I always begin with an initial design, but often it is changed entirely by the end of the process, (unless, the painting is a commission and in that case, I stick to the agreed upon sketches). It’s important to take breaks and study your art. I like to sit back with a cup of tea and let the painting tell ME what it needs instead of the other way around.

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“In the Current of Eagles” (Inspired by Rachael McCampbell’s poem of the same name) 24″w x 36″h. Oil on Canvas

What has drawn you to nature as the source for most of your painting inspiration?

I think my years of living on a farm outside of Knoxville and spending weekends in the Smoky Mountains inform what I do. As a child the majority of my time was spent out of doors: fishing, riding horses, working in the garden, playing in the fields, woods and creeks. The nature around me, the farms, the seasons and weather, were like a third parent to me. They fed and nurtured me.

Wildlife was always there and I’m sure I took it for granted. Had I known that I would live the majority of my life in large, urban cities, I would have taken more time to be appreciative of what I had. But now I am back with eyes wide open, and happily painting in an area that inspires and informs my work.

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“Egrets” (Inspired by Mary Oliver’s poem of the same name) 30″h x 40″w. Oil on Canvas

Your current show in Knoxville is featuring paintings inspired by poetry. Can you explain how you are creating art using this source of inspiration?

Years ago, I was accepted into a masters of writing program at Bennington College but had to turn it down to make a living as a commercial artist. I had a strong passion for writing and literature, and still do, but the majority of my time is taken up with painting now. The rich visual images that I see when I read spark my imagination like nothing else. Of course it’s often hard to settle on one image based on a poem when so many arise from a poem, or even a single line. At some point, I just have to decide on something and go with that. I think reading literature and poetry is a great tool to inspire an artist when one is stuck.

I started a series, in Los Angeles, based on the poetry of a well-known poet named Suzanne Lummis, who was going to collaborate with me on an exhibition. But I didn’t get to finish it because I was committed to do a solo show in Santa Monica with large paintings of horses and had to stop the process. So I sold the pieces off, but never did the show. A side note to that story is that I did a painting based on one of her poems, which I called “Woman and Apple.” When Ms. Lummis saw that painting, she wrote another poem based on that painting. She published that poem in a book called “Ekphastia Gone Wild: Poems Inspired by Art,” which came out in 2013. I love the way the arts feed and inspire one another.

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 “Mockingbirds” (Inspired by Mary Oliver’s poem of the same title) 30″ x 30″. Oil on Canvas.

After completing commissions, I was offered a solo show with the freedom to paint whatever I wanted, so I chose to go back to the theme of poetry inspired works. The owners of the District Gallery in Knoxville, Jeff and Denise Hood, were excited by this idea and have been very encouraging. The show is called “Dreamscapes: Poetry Inspired Paintings” and opens May 17, 2014 in Knoxville, TN.

Some of the poets and writers who have fed my work recently are Maya Angelou, Mary Oliver, Yeats, Donald Justice, Wallace Stevens, Suzanne Lummis, Wendell Berry, E.E. Cummings, Robert Francis and Raymond Carver.

blueWinter_McCampbell_16x20h“Blue Winter” (Inspired by Robert Francis’ poem of the same name) 16″w x 20″h. Oil on Canvas.

Blue Winter
by Robert Francis

Winter uses all the blues there are.

One shade of blue for water, one for ice,

Another blue for shadows over snow.

The clear or cloudy sky uses blue twice-

Both different blues. And hills row after row

Are colored blue according to how far.

You know the bluejay’s double-blur device

Shows best when there are no green leaves to show.

And Sirius is a winterbluegreen star.

Do you work on commission and where can we see more of your work?

I do work on commission quite often. I enjoy that process a great deal. It’s fun to personalize art for the client. Sometimes, each bird or flower or landscape holds a specific meaning for them. If the 3 birds in the painting represent their children, for example, then the art is dearer to the client for that reason.

The largest commission I’ve done was in 2012. It was 4’ high by 14’ long painting of horses running through the sky with a Scottsdale, Arizona landscape below. I went to Kentucky to take pictures of my thoroughbred subjects (their horses) and to meet the clients, then flew out with them to see their winter home in Park City, and to see the wall where they wanted the art to hang. It was good to see the environment, and go to art galleries with them to see and hear what they responded to in art. I was able to learn what was important for them in the painting by spending time there with them. They loved the finished product, thank goodness!

I show my work by appointment in Leiper’s Fork, on my website and of course, there will be this show in Knoxville inspired by poetry May 17th, 2014. I will put that series on my website in May 2014. I will also have work on view at Regions Bank in Franklin, 121 First Ave South, Franklin, TN 37064, at the next art crawl, Friday night, June 6th at 6 pm.

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“White Owl Flies Into and Out of Field” (Inspired by Mary Oliver’s poem of the same name). 30″w x 40″h. Oil on Canvas.

Thank you, Rachael! Your work is truly inspiring. For more information about Rachael and her work, see below:

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www.rachaelmccampbell.com

(All images courtesy of Rachael McCampbell. All paintings by Rachael McCampbell)

Photo of Rachael McCampbell by Ron Manville.

 

 

 

Area 2 Trading Co.

I am completely obsessed with a new website in town called, Area 2 Trading Co. Nashville’s Liza Canale has brilliantly combined shopping for high-end consigned furniture in an e-commerce twist. The result? A gorgeous website full of ever-changing (and stunning) treasures that you can shop for from your computer!

I had a chance to sit down with Liza and ask her a few questions about her newest venture. Enjoy!

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Vintage Tin Painted Box

Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background

I am proud to call myself a Nashville native. After graduating from Colorado College and living in the West for several years, I found myself gravitating back to the South. Initially, I worked in production for a nationally syndicated television program. When the production base moved from Nashville, I went to work in marketing and sales for a local design/French import business. After some years in the creative business community, I moved to Knoxville with my future husband where I obtained my Masters in Social Work from the University of Tennessee. I specialized in forensic interviewing and child therapy until my husband and I returned to Nashville to raise a family in 2007.

Since my childhood I have been exposed to the visual and decorative arts, and I consistently have found myself coming back to the design world as a passion and as a profession. At last I have finally synced passion and career. Now that my two boys are of school age, I can fully commit to bringing my plans for A2TC to fruition.

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Vintage Cane Queen Size Headboard

What led to the creation of Area 2 Trading Co.?

My mother was a sculptor before moving on to become an interior designer and painter. As a result, I have been immersed in the design and art world all of my life. A few years ago my mother asked that I help her sell a few of her nicer things. From there, I began managing estate sales out my garage and an old art studio. I was approached by many friends and neighbors to try and sell their things for them. It soon became apparent that while many people have home furnishings and art that they would like to put up for adoption, most dislike the hassle of estate sales and consignment stores. That is when I decided that Nashville needed an online marketplace for design-loving locals who want to sell old treasures or buy new ones with confidence in both the quality of the products and the transaction. Thus, Area 2 Trading Company was born!

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Mirrored Side Table

How do you determine your pricing for your consigned pieces?

Initially I get as much information and history about the product as possible from my sellers. Then I research items of similar age, style, and condition via design-centered websites. My goal is to offer the product at a realistic and competitive asking price. Naturally, sellers would like to recoup their investments. My role is to determine fair- market value in a design market that is constantly changing.

Liza-3

Mirrored Leaf Sconces

Can buyers come see the items in person?

Absolutely! In fact, I prefer that the item is viewed in person. This is one of the benefits of conducting business with A2TC.

Liza-4

Hand-made Chestnut Dining Table

Do you ship out of state?

Yes, shipping is available throughout the Unites States.

Ooooh, I cannot wait to jump back on that website to see what Liza’s latest finds are!

For more information about Liza and Area 2 Trading Co, click on her links below!

www.area2tradingco.com

Area 2 Trading Co – Facebook

A2TC_Logo_Tagline-01

(All images courtesy of Area 2 Trading Co)

HighlandChair

Outdoor Collection from John Lyle

With spring in full swing (well, minus the misstep mother nature had this week with those cold temps!), I am checking out fun and fresh outdoor furniture that I can use to better enjoy the next several warmer months ahead.  One line I cannot stop looking at? John Lyle’s Outdoor Furniture Collection. With a variety of colors, this elegant line with a youthful twist is just the look I want. Take a look:

Highland Chair

Highland Bench

Christofi Lounge

Dark Harbor Bench

Christofi Dining Chair

Aren’t these fun? Bring on the cookouts and garden parties!  To view the entire John Lyle Outdoor Collection, as well as his other lines and design work, see below:

JOHN LYLE OUTDOOR COLLECTION

JOHN LYLE DESIGN

Happy Easter Weekend!

Interior Design Blog

(All images courtesy of Andrew Joseph PR)

Dozier Home

Upcoming Interior Events Spotlight

Nashville has a lot going on these days! The city is buzzing with activity left and right. Today I am going to highlight three AMAZING upcoming attractions that are worth your attention!

O’MORE ALUMNI SHOWHOUSE:

Yep, they’re at it again! Interior Designers that are also alums of the O’More College of Design, have teamed up to design a 6,000 sq ft home in Downtown Franklin (a quick 15 minutes from Nashville). “The Dozier Home”, as it is known, will be one of several homes across the nation featured in Traditional Home Magazine’s National Showhouse Tour. Open April 4-27, this home will showcase trendsetting design ideas and stunning decor inspiration.  Notable firms such as Savage Interior Design, Dana Goodman Interiors and Mark Simmons Interiors are just a few of the amazing talented firms that will participate in this event. All proceeds from the Showhouse will benefit the O’More College of Design.

To find out more information about the O’More Alumni Showhouse, please visit: www.omoreshowhouse.com.

(Dozier House)

REDO HOME & DESIGN HOME TOUR:

This Saturday, April 5, 2014, the ever-talented Redo Home and Design firm will be hosting their second annual home tour benefitting Mocha Club. This fabulous tour will take you through 4 show-stopping homes in Nashville, guided by Redo’s amazing designers. Starting at 5:00pm, this is one event not to miss! For more information, see invitation below!

HGTV SMART HOME GIVEAWAY:

Yes, you read that right! HGTV has built a gorgeous, fully furnished 3 Bedroom/4.5 Bath English cottage style home near the Green Hills community. Designed by architectural firm P. Shea Design and constructed by Carbine Associates, this home not only features the latest technology trends, but has also achieved the National Green Building Standard rating of Silver as well as the TechHome rating level of Gold! To learn more about everything that makes this house so “smart” click here.

Want to see what this amazing house looks like on the inside? CLICK HERE for a virtual tour of all the beautifully designed rooms.

**Now, here’s the fun part. HGTV is hosting a sweepstakes, and one lucky winner will WIN the HGTV Smart Home with all its furnishings, a 2014 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid and  $100,000 courtesy of Quicken Loans. WOW!  During the giveaway period, eligible viewers can enter twice per day online: once at HGTV.com and once at HGTVRemodels.com. GOOD LUCK!

(HGTV Smart Home in Nashville-Exterior)

So much to do and see…so little time! Don’t miss out on these extraordinary happenings! Happy Thursday!

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(Image credits: 1-O’More College of Design; 2-Redo Home and Design; 3-HGTV.com)

Richards Front View

For the Love of Wallpaper

Unless you are a visionary, it’s hard to understand the impact wallpaper can have in a room until you see it hung on a wall.  Be it edgy geometrics, exquisite florals or understated textures, wallpapers can add that extra element needed to bring a room from predictable to powerful. I am so delighted today to have amazing Nashville designer, Natalie Hager with Natalie Hager Interiors, discuss the fun subject with you. Enjoy!

For the Love of Wallpaper

I was recently at a retreat with some ladies from my church wearing some turquoise blue leg warmers. It was cold outside and I needed a pop of color and extra layer of warmth on a gloomy and cold day. One of the ladies said, “I remember when we used to wear leg warmers in the eighties.” We laughed and said, “isn’t it funny how things come back around.” For those of you who kept yours, you were smart.

Isn’t it funny how things make a come back? Like wallpaper—fifteen years ago, we were pulling paper shreds off our walls and cursing ourselves for pasting it to our walls Now, we’re all putting it back.

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

“Are we crazy,” my clients ask me. “No, wallpaper is back in style,” I tell them. Sometime it can take a lot of convincing, because of the horrid memories every has of taking the stinking paper down and the price tag. Wallpaper is not cheap.

 

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

Wallpaper is expensive, but there’s nothing that can quite finish a room like papered walls. Its texture adds such a great element and another layer. 

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

 You don’t have to wallpaper an entire room either. You can just add it on an accent wall.

 

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

Or even on panels like artwork.

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

You can also just do it in a small room like an entry to tie together two spaces.

 

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

Or you can just add it to a wall that already has wainscoting to save some money.

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

I also like putting it on a ceiling to add pattern and texture.

With patterned wallpaper, you have to love the pattern and colors enough that you won’t get tired of them in a year from now. Choose wisely but know that nothing is permanent. There are great wallpaper primers that make it a lot easier to take paper down unlike what was used in twenty years ago.

 

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

If you are not a fan of pattern, try a texture and maybe add a pop of color in things like lamps, artwork and accessories that are more easily changeable.

 

(Courtesy of Natalie Hager Interiors)

Even though it was a thing of the past, wallpaper is one of the freshest ways to update a space. There are so many options and a lot of companies are carrying it.

(Courtesy of West Elm)

Companies like Serena and Lily, Anthropologie and even West Elm carry a variety of patterns and colors. 

(Courtesy of Serena and Lily)

If you want to go with a more custom paper, grab a designer or go to a local interior design store and go with a trade only paper. Some of my favorite companies are Cole and Sons who carry designer wallpapers like Vivienne Westwood, David Hicks and Schumacher.

( Hicks Hexagon via Decorpadvia Pieces)

 

Wallpaper is a sure way to refresh and spruce up any room. It’s like art and is an easy way to update your space. With some many different options, there’s bound to be one that you like. Test some samples and sleep on your options. You are sure to find one that makes you feel good and freshens up your room.

 …

Thank you, Natalie! I love all of these wallpapers you have highlighted! For more information about Natalie and her work, see below:

Natalie Hager Interiors
www.nataliehagerinteriors.com
Blog– la vie en rose

Interior Design Blog

Michael Devine2

Book Review: An Invitation to the Garden

Anyone who knows me knows I LOVE to entertain. I’d rather host an intimate dinner party over a meal at a fancy restaurant any night of the week. The familiar environment, the relaxed setting, the conversations and laughter that can last way into the night are only part of why I love to entertain. Many of my friends think I am crazy – but I actually love the preparation before the entertaining just as much as the entertaining itself. Deliberating over the menu, preparing the food, selecting the wine, concocting the perfect centerpiece and even lighting the candles are all part of my enjoyment prior to the guests even arriving. That personal touch and extension of myself to others is, to me, the best way I can connect to them.

When I received Michael Devine’s new book, An Invitation to the Garden, I was instantly smitten. I found a kindred spirit in Michael, one who also found pleasure in not only entertaining, but in preparing, planning and executing intimate events with friends as well.  Michael’s use of his own surroundings: fresh flowers and herbs from the garden, homemade delectable bites (recipes included!), personal linens to coordinate with various china and tableware, cozy, backyard areas for his intimate settings, all combine to create personal extensions of his taste and style and ultimately paint a reflection of how he truly enjoys connecting with others. Just take a look:

If you enjoy entertaining like I do, then you will truly enjoy this visually tasteful book. I cannot wait to incorporate several of Michael’s entertaining tips and delicious recipes for my next party!

To purchase this book, click here to order via Amazon, or find at your local bookstore.

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Special thanks to Rizzoli for the advanced copy of this book.

All images courtesy of Rizzoli and “An Invitation to the Garden”

Interior Design Blog

photo

The Relatable Canvas

This week my 3-year-old daughter decided to use the back of my sofa as her canvas for coloring. 

After posting this picture, my friends on Facebook and Instagram gave a collective gasp, then offered many condolences, stain remover company names, similar stories from their own homes, etc.  Yes, the shock of what had happened to my sofa set me back a bit, but what struck me even more was just how many people were commenting about this picture. This was not a show-stopping antique I was posting, no glamorous fabric in sight, not even a hint of design-fabulousness. Instead, it was a Crayola rainbow-colored upholstered piece of furniture that had everyone talking (either out of pity or horror) – because they could relate.

Whether it be because of a child, pet or even ourselves–we have all had those horrific devastating-decor moments happen within our homes. And as much as we strive for those House Beautiful and Elle Decor covers within our own landscapes, the reality is that most of our lives paint a much messier and a lot less perfect picture than those magazines depict!

Now, having said this, I am well aware that no one would buy any magazine featuring dirty laundry in the bathroom, unmade beds or dishes collecting in the sink. That would be depressing. These publications are meant to set the standards, raise the bar and give you goals for how to make things better and more beautiful. It would be nice, however, to see those inspiring rooms featured in magazine cover shoots, also be realistically photographed, after the cameras for the photoshoot went away. A few toys on the floor, a sippy cup in the crib, maybe a dog on the furniture, kids sprawled out on their beds doing homework…anything that showed life and realness and what 99% of our lives look like all the time. In my mind, it would create a more “relatable” appeal to me, the reader, where I could envision my own kids on those beds or my own self cooking in that kitchen, etc.

The same feeling goes out to the professionals or companies, who feature their services or products on Instagram, Facebook, or their own blogs. I love seeing the inspired pictures, the perfected rooms and the finished product “ta-da’s”. But I guarantee you, the expert who also shows and shares the not-so-glamorous moments and displays their human side (their relatable side)-the side that all of us can say, “I’ve been there!”–that is the person or company that will probably connect a lot more to their readers and build a greater following because of it.

With Interior Canvas, I love sharing images of beautiful interiors, work of amazing designers and inspiring ideas from talented individuals. But I’ve come to realize that sometimes it’s the goofs, messes and spills that resonate best with others, simply because it allows them to see that you are only human, that your life is just as busy and messy and chaotic as everyone else’s, and that because of this, you are relatable, normal and real. And you know what? That’s perfectly OK with me.

Happy Thursday!

Be sure to follow Interior Canvas on:

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 …

Interior Design Blog

 

DL Rhein-2

A Tale of Three Rooms: Before and After

I have to admit, “Before and After” stories are always my favorite. Well today is your lucky day, because I am featuring 3 rooms and their gorgeous overhauls–all from one house! Who is behind these radical transformations? Talented Los Angeles-based interior designer, Deborah Rhein of D.L. Rhein. Both artist and designer, Deborah has been impressing others with her artistic talent for over 20 years. In addition to her thriving design business, Deborah owns two stores that showcase specialty products, furniture and accessories from around the world. Featured in numerous publications, this designer is on point with her taste and style. It’s truly my pleasure to feature Deborah Rhein and her work today!

“Every exit is an entry somewhere else.” – Tom Stoppard

 (Before/Front Entry)

The entrance to a home is the first thing people see, including the homeowner. It should be an area to take pause and relish in before making your way into other rooms. Our clients were ready to makeover their newly acquired home, as it hadn’t been touched in several decades. What better place to start then in the heart of the home!

(After/Front Entry)

The original moldings and carved framing details were the star of the show and given new life with fresh high gloss paint. Removing the carpet was a must, and allowed for us to stain the stairs and railings to match the new deep ebony stain of the wood floor (a modern update while still keeping with the vintage charm of the architectural details of the house.) A chandelier made of jute and recycled glass from Ro Sham Beaux pulled the sea-foam tones out of the rug and silk lampshade. Needing a place to rest that doesn’t interrupt the flow of the entrance, made this bone inlay stool a perfect choice.

We found an antique sewing machine table hiding in another room of the house that held sentimental value to the family. Perfect in size and height, we brought it front and center to the entry. A vintage marble lamp and fresh flowers added a punch to a neutral area when set atop a stunning tray. (You should feel good each time you open the door into your home!)

”If you can organize your kitchen, you can organize your life.” – Louis Parrish 

(Before/Blond Wood Kitchen and Floors)

This kitchen hadn’t been touched in 30 years when our client’s moved into this home and they were ready for a sleek and modern update. The existing granite counter tops were quite exquisite and were flecked with silver and gold. The logical and economical choice was to update the blond wood cabinetry by staining them grey and refinish the floors in a warm espresso color. The results were amazing and it looked like a brand new space!

(After/Kitchen Remodel)

With a monochromatic palate, the space felt larger. Asbury Pulls from Restoration Hardware elongated the kitchen and were the perfect touch to freshly stained wood. Even the white stove looked new against the darker tones of the floor and cabinetry.

(Before/Refrigerator and Floors)

The refrigerator got a face lift, too, and now looked years younger.

An oversized glass jar from one of our favorite Belgian vendors was the perfect house for fresh bagels.

The window box was filled with all kinds of things that weren’t really being used. Vintage chinoiserie pots in navy and white filled with orchids were beautiful and serene, and added just the right amount of color to a fabulously zen remodel. (When the cook is happy, everyone is happy!)

Too many people just eat to consume calories. Try dining for a change.” – John Walters

(Before/Dining Room and Furniture)

After remodeling and making over the entry and kitchen, we couldn’t wait to transform this dining room, which was being used for everything else but that. Our clients were ready to have a beautiful space for family dinners and holiday entertaining, as it had become the catch-all for the kids’ school projects.

(After/Dining Room and Furniture)

This table and chair set was a fab and funky score from the homeowners’ parents. Redoing them with black lacquer and baby blue upholstered leather seats, made this vintage set a modern marvel. A grasscloth over metallic silver wallpaper by Phillip Jeffries seemed to make everything have a reflective glow. The vibrant painting was a favorite from one of my recent hunts and I loved picking up the blue from the seats in the trellis valances; the finishing touch to linen Roman shades.

 A vintage crystal chandelier now shined bright like a diamond, and fresh flowers and greenery made an inexpensive, yet impactful centerpiece when put in vintage pots and trays.

Cymbidum orchids created an updated spin on traditional houseplants and will continue to thrive in the lovely glow of the California sunshine.

 

Lighten the load, lighten your home, light up your life.

XO,

D.L.

Thank you, Deborah! These transformations are truly stunning! For more information about Deborah and D.L. Rhein, see below:

 …

D.L. RHEIN

www.dlrhein.com

3303 MOTOR AVE.

LOS ANGELES, CA. 90034

 …

Interior Design Blog

(Photos courtesy of Susan Salzman)

antique-scrimshaw-poker-chips1-687x459 (Trudy Dujardin)

Nantucket Style

I loved featuring the exterior beauty and charm of Nantucket on Monday. (Click here to revisit that post) But, I wanted to know more about Nantucket’s interior style and decor and needed to seek out an expert for their knowledge in this area. I couldn’t think of anyone better to ask than acclaimed designer, Trudy Dujardin of Dujardin Design Associates!  With offices in both Westport, CT and Nantucket, MA, Trudy’s experience with this island’s decor made her the perfect person to describe quintessential Nantucket style to you. It is my pleasure to have Trudy be my guest today. Enjoy!

I’ve been privileged to spend most of my life on Nantucket, as a visitor when I was a child, and as a part time-resident and owner of five homes on the island as an adult. I’ve designed many homes for clients here over the years, creating peaceful island sanctuaries for busy, successful people. This charming “little grey lady of the sea,” as she is known, is a sought-after vacation destination for beach lovers, history buffs, lovers and friends. It may just be one of earth’s most unspoiled places.

People often ask me to define “Nantucket Style.” Different people may answer that in different ways. I tell my clients, “You should know you’re living on an island.” Beyond that, design is led by the client, and their dreams and vision for their home. Still, there are some things that are classic Nantucket. Here are a few of my favorites:

Grey-shingled Cottages:

 Courtesy of Union Street Inn

The entire island is designated as a National Historic Landmark, with more than 800 houses built before the Civil War. The grey shingled homes and the morning and evening fog have contributed to the island’s nickname, “the little grey lady of the sea.” These houses have seen their fair share of salt-laden winds and winter squalls. The grey shingles stand up against the weather year after year; the cobblestone streets have lasted for generations as well. Along with the roses tumbling over gates and clinging to trellises, they are a distinct part of Nantucket’s charm.

You Can’t Have Too Many Whales: 

At least, not on Nantucket. Islanders first took to whaling in 1712, when they killed their first sperm whale. By the early 1800′s Nantucket was home to whaling ships setting out on voyages that could last for years. Whaling brought prosperity and diversity to the island. For years, the town was a bustling center of commerce, with casks of whale oil and goods from the Orient unloaded daily from the docks. Today, residents pay homage to the rich whaling history with whale art in their homes, whale signs and folk art carvings, and weather vanes. Whaling-related artifacts are popular, too. The authentic whaling logs, above, were mine for many years before I donated them to The Nantucket Historical Association.

 

Lightship Baskets:

Nantucket Lightship baskets are famous world-wide. They were first crafted by the calloused hands of sailors whiling away salt-sprayed hours on a vessel called a Lightship, an off-shore sentinel stationed at dangerous shoals.When new, they held bread and berries and sewing supplies. The baskets that survive are precious now, perhaps all the more so because once they were not. Today, you’ll find Lightship basket collections in many Nantucket homes. They’re so valued on the island that they have a museum dedicated to them.

 

Chinese Export Porcelain:

Chinese export porcelain is the quintessential island collectible, and has been for years. The technique for using blue decoration on white porcelain actually began in the Middle East in the 9th Century, but cobalt blue pigment was excavated from Iran and exported to China in the 9th Century as well. The striking porcelain quickly became popular, and trading routes expanded to Europe, Asia, Northern Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. Blue and white porcelain found its way to Nantucket as ballast on ships or in the trunks of sea captains and sailors.

 

Art That Celebrates the Sea:

Blue Horizon, by Michael Keane

The light on Nantucket has inspired artists for years. Marine art abounds in lovely beach homes. Michael Keane’s art (shown above) is a wonderful example of fine art that celebrates the ocean in all its natural beauty. Shows featuring Mr. Keane and other renowned artists are an established tradition on Nantucket, where people who love to sail and love the sea appreciate seascapes and ships recreated in art.

 

Scrimshaw:

Scrimshaw is the beautiful art form first practiced beginning in 1749, in the days of whaling ships, wizened sea captains and hardy sailors. Whaling was a dangerous undertaking and could never be attempted at night, leaving sailors with free time on their hands. They used it for carving elaborate pictures, lettering and scroll work on the bones and teeth of sperm whales and the tusks of walruses and other marine animals. The work they left behind is a treasured collectible today. Today, scrimshaw artists (called scrimshanders) work with eco-friendly or man-made materials, including cow bones, antlers and ostrich eggs.

 

The Colors of Sand and Sea:

The creamy tones of a sandy beach, the blues and greens of waves at daybreak, cloud-streaked sky and white-capped waves all inspire a tranquil palette for an ocean front home. Blue and white are classic color choices, with pale taupes and yellows a soothing backdrop for weekend and vacation living. Walks on the beach at sunrise and sunset inspire gentle washes of color on walls, floors, and fabric.

It’s possible to achieve island-style living in any home, and bring Nantucket’s beauty to your interiors no matter you live.

Thank you, Trudy, for sharing such wonderful insight about Nantucket style. For more information about Trudy Dujardin and Dujardin Design Associates, please see below:

Trudy Dujardin

Dujardin Design Associates

www.dujardindesign.com

BLOG: www.holistichouse.com

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Interior Design Blog

(All images courtesy of Trudy Dujardin unless otherwise noted)

Louise-on-the-Winged-stand-at-Tent-London-Design-Week-2012-1

The Artistic Life: Louise Rushford

Since I was already “across the pond” this week, featuring the Dormy House Hotel, I thought I’d stick around the UK a bit longer and inspire you with a little more European interior flair. Today’s post features brilliant artist and textile designer, Louise Rushford. Currently residing in Bath, England, Louise’s creativity is showcased through her beautiful paintings, fabric and wallpaper designs as well as other created interior accessories. I had the pleasure of asking Louise a few questions about her work and I am delighted to share that conversation with you today. Enjoy!

 …

As you are a trained fine artist, how did you decide to design fabrics and wallpaper?

My training was originally in sculpture at art school in London followed by a post-graduate in contemporary dance and have followed a career in the Arts since. A few years ago I taught drawing workshops at Bath School of Art to 1st year textile students . Whilst teaching in this department I began to investigate the design process for my own work and moved from Fine Art to design…. the rest is history!  I have always put the emphasis on drawing in my designs. All the designs start life as hand drawn illustrations, which are then treated as a digital canvas producing fabrics and products as if they are works of art .

  

What are your inspirations for your work?

I am originally from Glasgow in Scotland , studied and lived in London for 15 years, and finally moved to beautiful Bath 6 years ago. I think my work developed into a more design led style because I felt inspired by the beauty of the city’s architecture and interiors combined with my life-long passion for the colours, shapes, flora and fauna of Oriental design, particularly Chinese wallcoverings. I try to inject this traditional imagery with a modern and slightly darker atmosphere which is why I often include birds. They can have a somewhat sinister presence and curiously I am also terrified of them .

  

Tell us about your business, ArtHouse Originals. Where is it located, how can we purchase/find your pieces?

ArtHouseOriginals is a small but perfectly formed design house (located in Bath, England) which specialises in creating both original artwork and interior accessories. The ArtHouseOriginals elegant signature style is inspired by the flora and fauna imagery found in traditional Oriental art and design but with a contemporary Gothic British twist. ArtHouseOriginals luxury interior accessories can be purchased through our website.  ArtHouseOriginals distinctive product range includes – Exclusive Wallpapers (limited edition or hand painted), Luxury Fabrics and Interior Accessories (luxury cushions, lovely little footstools and wall hangings in gorgeously soft cotton velvet, crisp cottons or vibrant pure silks), Original Artwork and Hand Painted Decorative Screens.  We regularly take part in design fairs and have a busy year planned for 2014. ArtHouseOriginals was recently voted one of the best stands with unique products at Top Drawer & Craft design fair at the famous Earls Court in London. We are the featured design company on ACHICA luxury members only on-line boutique from the 17th to 23rd of February.

What are some exciting projects you are currently working on?

ArtHouseOriginals will be at the Decor Cafe Festival in London in March and London Design Week in Sept . We are hoping to launch new designs and a range of lamp shades.

Finally, what are some of the differences you see between British and American design?

British design has a reputation for being quite edgy, quirky and innovative. Design from the Unites States tends to generally be more classic using more natural materials. Of course there are always exceptions to this!

Thank you, Louise! Your work is unique and exquisite.

For more information on Louise and ArtHouse Originals, see below:

 

 LOUISE RUSHFORD

ArtHouse Originals

louise@arthouseoriginals.co.uk

Interior Design Blog

(All images courtesy of ArtHouse Originals)

kitchen-3-Edit-001

DIM “Did it Myself”: Kitchen Facelift

When Virginia-based photographer, Courtney, emailed me about her latest kitchen facelift, I immediately asked if I could feature it on the blog. I love a good “before and after” story, and this one doesn’t disappoint!  By cleverly spending money on the areas that would make the most amount of impact, Courtney was able to achieve major results without breaking the bank.  Read more of my conversation with Courtney, to find out how she transformed her not-so-cute kitchen into her favorite room in the house.

Tell me a little about your home (its style and age) as well as your family’s personal style and aesthetic.

We live in an old farmhouse, built in the 1920′s, west of Charlottesville, Virginia. It sits across the street from a large horse farm and was reportedly the farm manager’s house. The house is quirky as old houses tend to be. And many rooms have been added over the years by different owners, giving it a rambling feel. When we bought the house, we loved its “old house feel” and charm, but the very dated kitchen needed a little improving. As for our personal style, we love the contemporary/modern look combined with the old farmhouse feel.

Exterior of the House

What were the glaring issues for you in your kitchen that you wanted to correct?

Wow. The kitchen had many issues but fortunately all cosmetic. We were redoing it on a tight budget so we addressed issues that could be dealt with without demo or moving plumbing. The biggest problems in the kitchen were: a hunter green, black and white tile floor, hunter green formica counters, a white tile backsplash with an ivy design, and a small white shallow sink.

(Kitchen – Before Facelift)

(Kitchen – Before Facelift)

Tell us about your improvements for your kitchen facelift!

First, I would like to give credit to my good friend *Amber Brown, a designer, who gave advice on various aspects of the kitchen. Without her help we would have been lost! All demo and work was done by Mark Debow.

PAINT: A year ago we painted the cabinets and trim with Benjamin Moore Fieldstone and replaced the pulls with Restoration Hardware satin nickel bistro pulls. This was a great way to gradually start our facelift and enable us to keep the cabinets. *(One of the most rewarding pieces of advice I received was to paint the cabinets and trim the same color. It completely transformed the space and made a tiny space appear so much larger).

Benjamin Moore Fieldstone

Restoration Hardware Satin Nickel Bistro Pulls

FLOORS: The floor tile was ripped out and replaced with old barn oak from Appalachian Woods in Fishersville, Virginia. The oak was minimally sanded to preserve its character and sealed with a clear water based polyurethane. We moved out for a few days because of the fumes. But it is much less stinky than the oil based poly we had used previously in the family room.

(New Flooring)

COUNTERTOPS: We looked at honed granite, soapstone (which comes from a local quarry), and carrera marble. Surprisingly the price point of the marble was the best. I also thought that white countertops would look nice in a small kitchen. We did worry about the tendency of marble to stain and etch but decided to go with it once we discovered that 80 percent of kitchens in Europe have marble (in addition to all of those cool old French bakeries)!! And we are so very glad marble was our choice. It gives a nice contemporary look to a farmhouse kitchen. We sourced it through Cogswell Stone and picked out the marble at ARC in Richmond.

(New Carrera Marble Countertops)

TILE BACKSPLASH: We decided on a simple white subway tile and liked the look of the smaller 4 by 2 inch tiles. We found Essenze Ice tile at Wainwright Tile. It is an Italian mid range priced tile and has a subtle variation in texture.

(New Tile Backsplash)

BAR COUNTERTOP: The bar was also covered in hunter green formica which we ripped out. I hoped for the look of an old farm table but at bar height. I wanted the bar to look like it was a part of the original house so we found some huge old oak planks from Appalachian Woods and my father built the table (thanks dad!). He minimally sanded the wood and applied a very thin whitewash to render a cerused look.

(New Bar Countertop!)

SINK: This may have been my favorite addition to the new kitchen. Stainless deep undermount. We can bathe my 2 year old in it! It is a Franke Grande series 31 inch undermount sink.

(New Sink!)

APPLIANCES: We removed the microwave and installed a stainless ductless vent. It was a cheap way to really improve a small cooking space! We also replaced the stove with a stainless Fridgidaire FS3085k 30 inch slide in electric range . It looks and works beautifully. My one complaint is that its fan blows cold air out of the top of the oven door which can be unsettling at times. But otherwise a great stove/oven.  At some point, we hope to replace that old fridge with a stainless one!

(New Electric Range and Stainless Vent!)

 …

By keeping the cabinets and most of the appliances we were able to keep the costs down and achieve a kitchen that has become our favorite room in the house. Even my two year old approves!

Wow! What a transformation! And I love the fact that you were able to make such a change for a relatively small amount of money.

Thank you for letting our readers see your beautiful kitchen facelift.

(Photos 5&6 courtesy of Benjamin Moore and Restoration Hardware)

(All other photos courtesy of Courtney Coker Photography: courtaloo@gmail.com)

*(Denver, CO -based Amber Brown (Interior Designer): amber.brown@mac.com)

If YOU have a great “DIM”transformation in your house you’d like me to feature, email me at: info@interiorcanvas.com and I’ll take a look!

Remember to follow Interior Canvas on:

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Interior Design Blog

Classic Kitchen Towels - Savage Interior Design - Taigan.com

Jonathan Savage’s Luxurious Linens

 

It seems natural that because of their creative spirit, interior designers will often expand their businesses into other creative venues. Collaborations with fabric companies, inspired new paint colors, a line of furniture for an established brand, etc are just a few examples of ways this creativity may surface. Today I am showcasing one designer’s newest creative expansion. Nashville designer, Jonathan Savage with Savage Interior Design, has been making a name for himself in the interior design world for some time. It comes as no surprise, then, that he would decide to design several beautiful soft linens to compliment anyone’s interior palette. I had the pleasure to chat with Jonathan about this latest venture and I’m pleased to share that conversation with you today!

You have such a thriving interior design business…what made you want to expand into a home accessories/goods line?

When I’m designing a home, I love adding the small details…where the silverware should go, which books the client will want in the library…for many people it’s these little things that go a long way. Some of my favorite pieces to find for clients are kitchen and bath towels, and I was never content with what was out there. That being said, when I came across a fabric weaver from the hills of Tuscany last year, I was thrilled! After spending many hours choosing designs and a few trips to the factory in Italy, I decided to partner with them to create a line of luxurious soft goods for the home.

Hand Knotted Linen Towel (Savage Interior Design)

Tell us a little about this line…what type of accessories are you carrying and single out a few of your favorites!

The line has everything from classic kitchen towels and aprons to luxurious bath towels and bedding. One of my favorite things about it is that we can combine any of the colors and styles to create something unique and custom for each client’s home. We are currently working on monograms for bath towels that we will be introducing in the spring-I would have to say they are my favorites right now! Of course you cannot go wrong with any of our Classic Kitchen Towels either.

 

Classic Kitchen Towels (Savage Interior Design)

You travel quite a bit throughout the year with your work. How has your traveling inspired this creative extension to your business?

Traveling is my thing. I actually met the fabric weavers for my line while visiting Paris last September for Maison & Objet, which prompted my spontaneous trip to their village in Tuscany!

When out and about, I am always on the prowl for new and exciting things and beautiful items. You can check out the Interior Canvas post from January of last year titled “The Treasure Hunt” to get even more insight into my world of travel and how it inspires my designs.

Classic Embroidered Apron (Savage Interior Design)

Since we’re talking about travel: Any fun upcoming trips you can mention? And what are your 5 “must-haves” travel accessories you never leave on a trip without?

Beaver Creek, New York, and Palm Beach are all on the schedule right now, and that’s just in February!

Here are some things I never travel without…

-A hostess gift if I am staying with a friend-always a kitchen towel from my line, and maybe a Christian Tortu candle that I brought back from Paris

Kitchen Towels with Animals (Savage Interior Design)

 Christian Tortu Candle

-Business cards-you never know who you’re going to meet!

 

-My tote bag that goes absolutely everywhere with me

(This Burberry tote bag looks like it’s the perfect travel companion!)

-My MacBook Air-it’s the perfect size for travel

 

 

-Bert’s Bees Chapstick

Where can we purchase and see the rest of  the SAVAGE collection?

It is available on Taigan.com or by appointment at our showroom in Nashville. You can reach us at info@ljonathansavage.com

 What a delightful line that would look good in anyone’s home! I can’t wait to see what will come next! Thank you, Jonathan!  For more information about Jonathan and Savage Interior Design, please read below:

Savage Interior Design

 L. Jonathan Savage, Interior Designer-ASID, IIDA

o) 615.244.5674

info@ljonathansavage.com
w) www.ljonathansavage.com

Nashville Interior Design Blog

(All image credits embedded in image. Hover over image to see source)

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Two Book Reviews — Two Very Different Styles

Last year produced an avalanche of amazing interior drool-worthy books.  It was hard to keep up with the pace of writing reviews vs. new books hitting the market! Today I am featuring two books published last year that showcase amazing designers with very different aesthetics. I am a fan of both of these designers and after seeing some of these pictures, I hope you will appreciate the insane talent each designer exhibits. Enjoy!

Make it Fabulous

William T. Georgis

Make it Fabulous features the uber-complex and diverse work of architect and designer, William T. Georgis. Last fall, Interior Canvas had the pleasure of interviewing William about his work and “behind the scenes” stories from a few of his projects. To read that article, click here.  Make it Fabulous showcases several extremely custom created spaces that William has designed for clients. Catering to an elite clientelle with tastes that push the envelope, William superbly blends visual complexity with artistic brilliance, leaving you in awe of his fascinating fabrications. Take a look at some of his work featured in this 244 page book:

(All Photography by T.Whitney Cox)

Make it Fabulous  is a an excellent addition to your coffee table. For more information click here, or find at your local bookstore.

Timeless Style

Suzanne Kasler

Atlanta-based Suzanne Kasler has always been a favorite of mine. Her interior canvases display a talented mix of Southern sophistication and elegant refinement.  And her latest book, Timeless Style, does nothing to disappoint. In addition to featuring several jaw-dropping projects from a Tennessee farmhouse to a Florida beach house, Timeless Style  also gives design tips to the reader (woo hoo!) and inspiring words of advice.  Check out some examples of Suzanne’s work featured in her beautiful 304 page book:

(Photography by Beall + Thomas)

(Photographed by Simon Upton)

(Photographed by Miguel Flores-Vianna)

(Photograph by Simon Upton)

(Photograph by Simon Upton)

Timeless Style is one book not to be overlooked! Buy it here or find at your local bookstore.

As always, feel free to email me with questions, topics you want to know more about, designers you’d like to hear from, books you’d like to see reviewed and more. I always love to hear from the readers~

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Interior Design Blog

IMG_7897

San Antonio’s Newest Hotspot: The Tiny Finch

There’s a new store in San Antonio that is quickly making a name for itself. The brainchild of Courtney Beauchamp, this space fuses all of the elements you’d want in a shop without all the fluff you’d ignore anyways. With a name as unique as its inventory, The Tiny Finch creates a different (and better!) concept for what today’s home stores should be like. I hope the trend continues!  Interior Canvas had the pleasure to talk with Courtney to learn more about The Tiny Finch and what exactly makes it so unique.

 …

Thank you for being here today, Courtney! How did the idea for The Tiny Finch originate?

I am from Houston, and every time I would go to Houston, I would be inspired by what I saw that was not in San Antonio!  I think this was the fuel behind the Tiny Finch. There were gift stores in San Antonio, but not what I would call a “Lifestyle Store.”

Recently, there was an article in the Wall Street Journal that my husband gave to me. It spoke about the “General Store” concept being reintroduced. Everything from jewelry and books, to even food and coffee! I don’t have an interest in food and coffee (especially since an amazing coffee shop called Local Coffee just opened up next door to me!), but the “General Store” concept I can relate to!

The Tiny Finch has a bit of everything in it: great letterpress cards, art, jewelry, coffee table books, clothes, home decor, rugs and furniture.

 

(via The Tiny Finch)

(via The Tiny Finch)

List 5 favorite things you are crushing on in your store right now:

5 FAVORITE THINGS -

1) I am obsessed with Turkish and Moroccan rugs right now. I just got back from market and found these amazing cream colored ones with brown stripes. I also have brighter Turkish ones: runners and large area rugs that make a great statement in a room!

2)  Roost Chairs. Roost makes the coolest chairs! They are affordable and just different. They have a very organic look to them (think jute and iron or iron and canvas).

(Example of a Roost Chair- not necessarily in The Tiny Finch inventory)

3)  Canvas is another favorite right now! We have waxed canvas aprons, waxed canvas wallets and bags, and light canvas throws in muted colors. I just love the feel, the look-everything about canvas right now!

4)  The coffee table books we have in right now are amazing. You can get lost looking through them too – everything from Moroccan tiles, Shabby Chic, to a book titled “Wisdom.” They’re all inspiring!

5) Nest Bamboo Candle. It smells amazing and isn’t too overpowering.

What sets The Tiny Finch apart from other stores?

Unique things! I really try hard to bring in things you won’t see everywhere – I mean I try really hard!  But if I mentioned them in this article, they may not be so unique anymore….so I am going to have to say, come to the store and find out for yourself!

(via The Tiny Finch)

Well you don’t have to twist our arm to come to check out The Tiny Finch! What a great concept…we hope more of these pop up across the country! 

Thank you, Courtney! For more information on Courtney and The Tiny Finch, please read below!

www.thetinyfinch.com

San Antonio Interior Design Blog

(Unless otherwise noted, all images’ credits are embedded in pictures. Please hover your mouse over image to see source)

AR-final

The Artistic Life: Angie Simeone-Rzasnicki

 

I am delighted today to be featuring Nashville artist, Angie Simeone-Rzasnicki. Angela’s creativity never ceases to amaze. Last year her uncanny ability working with paper was showcased on the blog (to read that article click here). Readers from across the nation were mesmerized by her unique perspective on such a commonplace material. It seems that in everything she does, via marketing savviness or creative channeling, Angie sets the bar higher and higher and we can only wonder what she will do next. Interior Canvas is focusing today on Angie’s clear talent and skill in the painting world. Her abstract canvases have been the talk of Nashville.  When I found out several of her paintings were featured on “Nashville” (the hit TV show), I couldn’t wait to chat with Angie to learn more about her creative career and, of course, her TV debut! Enjoy!

You are so artistic in a wide variety of mediums. How/When did your talent for painting begin?

I began working with an art teacher turned mentor, David Guidera about two years ago, finding him was a stroke of luck. Over the last eight years, I have taken college courses, attended local classes and participated in groups all to develop my painting skills and technique. Driving to East Nashville, in the cold weather, for 7:30 am class with blue-haired 19-years olds was what it looked like for me to get started and made me feel like I was learning again. The “10k hour” rule is an absolute in painting and important in locating your style — which classifies me as a complete newbie. Historically apprenticeship has made trade generational and that’s a beautiful thing no matter what you are learning. Ultimately though, both research and by “just beginning” allowed me to create this new opportunity in my life — taking that first step creates happen-chance.

 

Working creatively as an artist, yet with a business degree from Georgia, touch on how these two elements have woven their way throughout your life and career?

My aesthetic-aspirations comprise interior design and painting of which I have developed through several amazing clients.  All of my clients have been people who have seen my home and want the same look and feel, its eclectic and sophisticated without being serious.  Painting a custom piece for a space finishes and adds the exclamation point.  Finding homes for my paintings is satisfying and it frees up creative space in my head so I can continue to paint.  If I have too many paintings at a time, I tend to get a little bogged down.

Creative outlets come in varied forms. Having and raising three boys is my greatest creation, privilege and reason-to-be, so all my life and professional decisions filter through this primary focus. However, pre-children, my career made me complete and it is nice to begin to again put energy towards work. In my perfect world, I would paint, have a couple of design clients and develop marketing initiatives for health care companies. That may sound arrogant to think I can do all of that but having a supportive husband can make anything a reality and has for me. Working as a team has allowed me to develop my interests

 …

Walk us through your steps (both literally and creatively) when you begin a new painting.

Painting like anything else takes work as well as many decisions to keep a forward momentum — it has to die and be reborn a couple of times. Re-building anything is scary, frustrating and humbling. Standing back and getting perspective is apart of painting and an acquired skill set, one I am hoping to develop and add to my day-to-day.
I measure out my own canvas from a roll and most paintings begin on the floor, with black and white line. I am a gestural painter who creates details by happen-chance and doesn’t like detail. I usually work on one concept and paint it in four to ten paintings. I’ve done buildings, birds and floral abstracts that all rely on color to create depth and differences. The movement in a painting and its stillness is what I find interesting. Finding quite moments in the work is important to me and I am hoping to grow towards less chaotic and more cohesive paintings.
A custom piece for Lauren Leonard, designer of the Leona line.
Do each of your paintings represent a specific message or mood you are trying to convey?
“Proving” something in a painting takes working through a mental checklist and reason — as I am not methodical when I paint– I hope to improve with time and age. Sometimes, I get anxiety about all of the good work I did the week before on a painting but know it needs to move forward with change, and then I see all the amazing work my mentor has repainted, and I feel better. My best works are when I was time intensive in laying the ground work, give it a rest and then come back to it fresh and finish it quickly.

This is a work started on the ground that became 4 pieces.

 …

How did your paintings end up on the set of “Nashville”? Give us they story! Also, did they give you any direction for what to paint, color schemes, etc?

A scout for the show Nashville, Trish Tallon-Blanchard, heard about my work from my mentor and contacted me.  She came to my house and went through my pieces and loaded up about 10 to take back to Ruby, the show’s art director.  Both the art director and the set designer liked my work and decided on 4-5 pieces of already existing paintings plus requested I paint several additional pieces in red.   The guest director, Eric Stoltz from “Some Kind of Wonderful” was feeling the color red.  I lived for John Hughes movies so I painted as much red as I could –six total and they used three.

                  Six Red Paintings Angie painted for the “Nashville” show to consider. They chose three in addition to the others already taken from her existing portfolio.

Angie’s painting behind “Nashville” character, Rayna James

Another of Angie’s paintings behind “Nashville” character, Juliette Barnes

Trish also wanted me to paint a custom piece for the hotel entry for a specific scene so I met her downtown at  the Hotel Indigo and we measured the space and took pictures for inspiration. The piece “Coming Off the Bloom” is a sequential abstraction of a flower losing its petals.  The episode was about Juliette Barnes being duped by her manager boyfriend.

 Angie’s piece, “Coming Off the Bloom” hanging in the Hotel Indigo lobby during a “Nashville” episode

Coming Off the Bloom

Where can we see more of your work?

My work can be found on my website at angiesimeone.com and the Beth Haley Design showroom from January through March.  For Interior Canvas readers, January and February, some of the pieces on my website will be at a 50% discount and any custom pieces size 6′ and under would be a flat fee of $1,200. Contact me for more information.

 …

Original Print

Angie Simeone-Rzasnicki

www.angiesimeone.com

Nashville Interior Design Blog

PHC_2814

Christmas in Savannah – The Updated Traditional

As you enter into the home stretch before Christmas, we know all you really want to do is drop everything and go take a nap! But instead of napping, why not rest a few minutes and escape the holiday chaos by feasting your eyes upon some beautiful holiday decor.  Today we’re showcasing one beautiful Savannah, Georgia home that was elegantly spruced up for the holidays. Designer Elizabeth Camp Wynn, with Elizabeth Interiors, helped orchestrate this holiday facelift. We’re delighted today to have her share more about this beautiful home and also provide you with some tips for incorporating holiday decor into your own homes.

Christmas in Savannah – The Updated Traditional

I was delighted to help create a classic, refined, yet refreshing twist of Christmas decor to this beautiful Skidaway Island home. Located about 20 minutes southeast of historic Savannah, Skidaway Island echoes many of the same characteristics of Savannah’s well-known classic architecture and authentic identity. This newer home was no exception. Traditional “bones” established the landscape for this cool color scheme, that were also warmed and brightened by metallic tones. Hints of the Low Country highlighted the area without overpowering. As I approached the overall idea for the decor in this home, it was important to me that continuity remain key in the design concept. By incorporating the existing color palette and transitional style, a definite message was established…..that it was possible to compliment your surroundings while celebrating the season!  The following pictures show how that message came to life:

As you can see, this Christmas decor was woven into this home’s color palette without competing against it. Careful attention was paid to complimenting pre-existing color schemes and enhancing the interior elements already in place. The result? A seamless mix of temporary seasonal items and permanent fixtures looking festive and ready for the holidays!

Needing some tips on using Christmas decor within your own home? Here’s Elizabeth’s Christmas Design advice:

1. Allow your existing surroundings to be a starting point in selections. This is the best way to dictate direction. Be your own authentic self!

2. Go for brighter and oversized on the exterior of your home. This will generate better visibility in the evening.

3. Use a variety of shapes and sizes in ornaments – and bigger is usually better. Establishing color concept is imperative. In this design, there are only four to five colors utilized, but a definite assortment of opacity and form.

4. Weaving ribbon and incorporating metallic branches throughout greenery and your tree breathes new life. It also serves as a connecting factor. Even if you have many mismatched or family-made ornaments (which we all do), here is a simple way to set continuity and give a polished appearance.

5. Preparation is key. Begin early in your decorating venture. Holidays can be stressful; allocate an appropriate amount of time in order to not become overwhelmed. We all know it usually takes longer than the time initially allowed.

6. Infuse local flavor into your Christmas. This home encompasses the lifestyle of Savannah and the Low Country – Traditional. Coastal. Vibrant. Inviting.

 …

Thank you, Elizabeth, for infusing some Christmas cheer into our day!

And thank you, our readers, for making Interior Canvas so successful!  We have loved bringing so many wonderful articles your way and can’t wait to turn to our next chapter in 2014!  We’ll be off the next 2 weeks to spend holiday time with family and friends. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! See you in 2014!!!

 For more information on Elizabeth Camp Wynn, and other contributors for this story, please read below.

Elizabeth Interiors – Elizabeth Camp Wynn

elizabethwynn@comcast.net – 912.667.1998

Other Contributors for this Story:

Floral Designer: Harvey Designs – www.harveydesigns.com 912.495.9300

Photography: phc Photos – Paul Camp Photography 912.352.7965/912.308.7428

Homeowners: Lindsay and Edward Sammons

Items purchased at America’s Mart – Raz, Sullivan’s, Jim Marvin, Meravic, d. Stevens

Savannah Interior Design Blog

IMG_4427

Peter Fasano and Elizabeth Hamilton: The Fabric Designing Duo

Peter Fasano and Elizabeth Hamilton are quite the dream team when it comes to designing fabric. Veterans of the textile industry, this dynamic duo continues to set the bar incredibly high with their gorgeous, original designs and quality fabrics.  Their superior skill in custom work is what sets these two apart, so it is no surprise to learn that many notable designers as well as several well-known celebrities have these two on speed dial, to help with one-of-a-kind creations. A few weeks ago, Interior Canvas had the pleasure to meet and speak with Peter and Elizabeth and we are delighted to share that conversation with you today. Enjoy!

Thank you, Peter and Elizabeth, for talking with us today! How did you get started in the textile business?

PF: I went to Parson’s School of Design in NYC and David Easton was one of my professors. After I graduated, I worked for Dorothy Draper and helped design hotels. My interest in design really peeked when I started painting canvases on my floor apartment. I hung the 6 foot canvas on my wall and at that moment, I knew I wanted to design fabric. David Easton asked me, “Would you ever try designing fabric for a living?” At that point, I began painting fabric as David Easton introduced me to designer greats such as Albert Hadley, Halston and Mary McFadden, among others. I began traveling to Dallas, Florida, Atlanta and NYC, where dealers began representing my hand painted fabrics. In 1990, I moved to Massachusetts and  learned how to silk screen, which helped me switch from the more labor-intensive hand painting to the silk screen method . In 1995, I opened a studio with 125 yards of print tables and about 15 employees. Currently, most of my work is custom fabric design with my fabrics represented in stores such as John Rosselli & Associates in NYC, Hollywood at Home in Los Angeles, and George Cameron Nash in Dallas, Texas.

EH: My grandmother was a superior seamstress and I learned how to sew when I was 5. I’ve always loved fabrics and textiles. I’d  visit fabric stores regularly and sew my own clothes. I met Peter Fasano through family friends, as we shared common interest in fabrics. We would both walk miles and miles looking at fabric, buying a yard here and there. I then moved to NYC for my Senior year in college. One day I was flipping through a Gourmet magazine issue and saw the “meal of the month” with a hand painted tablecloth that happened to be Peter Fasano’s work. We got in touch again and married as our love of fabrics continued! I’ve collaborated with Peter now for over 30 years. Three years ago, I began my own line of textiles.

How are your styles similar and different?

PF: My fabrics are more graphic with bolder colors. I’m far more interested in a pattern and whether you can use it in a home, comes secondary.

EH: My work is more feminine with my thoughts centered on how my design will fit in a home.

(It’s clear Elizabeth and Peter are the perfect match as they are always editing each other’s work!)

What is your method in producing your textiles?

It’s called “pigment-printing” that uses many layers of colors. The technique is flat-bed silk-screen (hand silk-screening). (Peter and Elizabeth mainly work with linens, cottons and hemp.)

Do you ever look at design trends? What is your inspiration?

PF: Yes! It’s impossible to not be influenced by everything. I don’t think anything is new. I think it’s all a collage of what’s happened before. How do you put old wine into new bottles? It’s how you assemble it. You never know where you’ll find a pattern.

EH: We really don’t look at what other designers are doing, but we probably should. We subscribe to many magazines but don’t take the time to read them. Instead we see interesting patterns all over the place such as in old movies, on walks or in nature.

What has been the most fun part of your job?

Both: Traveling and meeting such incredible people!

Esteemed designers, such as Bunny Williams, regularly request custom fabric designs from Peter and Elizabeth. Even our former first Lady, Laura Bush, hired Peter to design textiles for her home in Austin, when President Bush was Governor of Texas. He was also used again by the Bush family to help update several rooms in  the White House, and has continued to work with them in designing their present-day Dallas home.

In summary, Peter and Elizabeth are so talented, they truly can design any fabric your heart desires. They have a passion for custom prints and it shows!

Thank you Peter and Elizabeth for taking the time to talk with Interior Canvas! We are in awe of your talent and contribution to the interior world.

(Interior Canvas gal, Cameron, with Peter Fasano and Elizabeth Hamilton)

Peter Fasano and Elizabeth Hamilton

www.peterfasano.com

www.elizabethhamiltoncollection.com

(All images courtesy of Interior Canvas)

(Note: First photo with black and white dots in background is Peter’s fabric called “Double Dotty” – it’s been recently installed on the walls of  Hollywood at Home)

mainimage

Michael Berman: Bronze Studio

Los Angeles has begun to spoil Interior Canvas gal, Cameron, with its incredible amount of fabulous design studios, textile showrooms, interior stores and galleries galore. So little time, so much to see! Recently, Cameron had the pleasure of meeting talented artist, Michael Berman, in his Los Angeles studio. Michael is a man of so many talents (furniture creator, artist, textile designer…just to name a few!) and it was a treat getting to see a few of his creations firsthand! He recently opened Bronze Studio which is located in the heart of the Beverly Art & Design District (BADD). This light-filled space houses many of his custom pieces, as well as, vintage pieces he sells to designers and clients all over the world.

Here are some of our favorites, beginning with his outdoor furniture he designed for Brown Jordan, labeled as the Papillon Lifestyle Collection .

We love these roomy pieces that would compliment any outdoor space quite nicely!

 In addition to Michael’s outdoor furniture line, Bronze Studio showcases sleek and more contemporary pieces that bring touches of modern sophistication to a space.

Falcon Sofa

Cumberland Bar Stools

Ventura Tables

Moongate Console

Michael has also designed a beautiful fabric collection with  Kravet. We love this geometric print of his below!

Kravet Collection by Michael Berman

Currently, Mr. Berman is working on an additional textile line for Kravet, inspired by the desert with a vintage, modern twist. He is also expanding his creative flow by designing plumbing fixtures, wallpaper, rugs, and even lighting. Michael’s genius is evident in all of his pieces. We are in awe of his talent and grateful for his many contributions to the design world!

Thank you, Michael, for giving us a glimpse inside your beautiful LA studio and storefront. We look forward to seeing more of your work in years to come. To contact Michael Berman, please see his information listed below:

Michael Berman

Bronze Studio

7257 Beverly Blvd , suite 100

Los Angeles, CA 90036

323-932-9700

INFO@BRONZESTUDIOLA.COM

www.bronzestudiola.com

Images: 1-2) bronzestudiola.com, 3-6) interiorcanvas, 7) 1stdibs.com 8) kravet.com 9) lcdqla.com

Los Angeles Interior Design Blog

 

 

WinterCover

There’s a New Magazine in Town: MILIEU

Courtesy of Milieu

There’s a new magazine in town that is hitting the interior design world by storm. Brainchild of uber-talented Houston designer, Pamela Pierce, Milieu brings a breath of fresh air into the printed publication arena. Featured quarterly (its first issue was early this Fall), Milieu treats its readers to thick glossy pages that showcase jaw dropping interiors and eloquently written editorials. We love that this magazine does away with frivolous filler, and instead, focuses on quality content–how refreshing!  Interior Canvas was lucky enough to catch up with founder and chief editor, Pamela Pierce, and ask her a few questions about Milieu. We hope you enjoy!

What has been the inspiration for Milieu, and how did this originate?

I have always been influenced by beautiful surroundings, and I really wanted to discover and share new people, places, and things – the surroundings – that move me. That’s why I decided on the name MILIEU. I just felt there was a need, with many shelter magazines closing. With the support of my wonderful husband and family and a talented team, we are now on our second issue.

Courtesy of Milieu / Photographed by Peter Vitale

How is Milieu different from other top design magazines?

Our goal is to really focus on great editorial and unknown designers. We want to showcase homes with beautiful photography and photo spreads in the magazine that welcome you into each home.

Courtesy of Milieu / Photographed by Peter Vitale

Tell us about your winter issue. What are some of the highlights?

This issue features Winter Whites. We highlighted Helen Amy Murray, an artist who sculpts leather and other textiles in the most beautiful ways. We reveal some of the best practitioners of white, such as Washington, D.C.-based decorator Darryl Carter, who takes us through his nearly-all-white home-furnishings store. And all of the homes in this issue are white. You can see the issue online at www.milieu-mag.com

Courtesy of Milieu / Helen Amy Murray / Photographed by Andreas Von Einsiedel

Courtesy of Milieu / Daryl Carter’s store in Washington, D.C. / Photographed by Greg Powers

What is the most exciting part of working on Milieu?

I have been fortunate to travel on so many great photo shoots and meet the nicest people.

Courtesy of Milieu

How do you see Milieu growing  in 5 years?

With this issue, you can now find Milieu in many major airports, including LAX, Laguardia, Atlanta, Houston Intercontinental and Houston Hobby, DFW, Love Field and Chicago airport in the spring. You can also find us in all Barnes & Noble stores nationwide, in other high-end bookstores and high-end grocery stores. With that exposure, we hope to continue to grow our subscription base and continue to highlight the best homes and designers.

Courtesy of Milieu / Photographed by Fran Brennan

How have you incorporated the blog world into Milieu?

In each issue, we ask our readers to nominate blogs they enjoy reading. We then feature one nominated blog on the last page of each issue. If you have a favorite blog you’d like to share, email editor@milieu-mag.com

 …

If you are as enchanted by these images as we were, then you will LOVE reading the rest of Milieu magazine!  And with holiday gift giving in full force, we couldn’t think of a better idea than a subscription to Milieu!  To learn more about Milieu magazine and subscribing, CLICK HERE.

Many thanks to Pamela Pierce for sharing her time with us to answer our questions. We wish you much success!

MILIEU 

WWW.MILIEU-MAG.COM

(All images used with permission from Milieu Magazine)